elizabeth

03 Aug 2018 38 views
 
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photoblog image Mountain Avens

Mountain Avens

(Dryas octopeteala)

 

The flowers of Mountain avens track the movement of the sun across the sky during the day, a phenomenon called heliotropism. Most plants that have similar abilities do so to reduce the amount of solar radiation striking their flowers or leaves. In Dryas, the flowers do the opposite, moving to maximize the amount of sunlight reflecting off the petals and onto the mass of pistils at the center of the flower. Experiments by researchers in Sweden have shown that flowers that track the sun are warmer and have pistils that develop faster and produce heavier seeds than those that are in shade.  

 

It is a circumpolar species found in arctic tundra of northern Eurasia and North America, but also extending southward above tree line in the Cascades and Rocky Mountains to Washington, Oregon, Utah, and Colorado.

 

photoblog image Colorado Trip 91  B.jpg

 

photoblog image Colorado Trip 94 B.jpg

 

 

Mountain Avens

(Dryas octopeteala)

 

The flowers of Mountain avens track the movement of the sun across the sky during the day, a phenomenon called heliotropism. Most plants that have similar abilities do so to reduce the amount of solar radiation striking their flowers or leaves. In Dryas, the flowers do the opposite, moving to maximize the amount of sunlight reflecting off the petals and onto the mass of pistils at the center of the flower. Experiments by researchers in Sweden have shown that flowers that track the sun are warmer and have pistils that develop faster and produce heavier seeds than those that are in shade.  

 

It is a circumpolar species found in arctic tundra of northern Eurasia and North America, but also extending southward above tree line in the Cascades and Rocky Mountains to Washington, Oregon, Utah, and Colorado.

 

photoblog image Colorado Trip 91  B.jpg

 

photoblog image Colorado Trip 94 B.jpg

 

 

comments (18)

  • Harry
  • USA
  • 3 Aug 2018, 00:43
a fine parade of blooms
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: They are! Thanks, Harry!
Beautiful flower and very good closeups...
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thanks so much, Larry!
Three nice pic's Elizabeth, I like how each one is closer, they are a lovely colour also.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thanks so much, Frank! I'm glad you think it works... Yes - I do like that creamy white with the bold yellow stamens!
  • Steven
  • Chicagoland
  • 3 Aug 2018, 03:30
What gorgeous flowers with these explosive anthers and filaments!!
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thanks, Steven! Great description!
hat interesting info here about these beauties, Elizabeth.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thanks, Ginnie! And again - such tiny little creatures! smile
Cette petite fleur est vraiment très belle ..bravo pour cette belle série de photos
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thanks so much, Claudine! I'm so glad you've enjoyed these photos!
  • Chris
  • Not Nowhere
  • 3 Aug 2018, 06:34
These are delightful. It's got me wondering if any of our UK species have the same sort of sun-tracking ability
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: I would imagine they do... true sunflowers do also...
  • Astrid
  • Nederland
  • 3 Aug 2018, 06:47
OH, these are darling flowers, Elizabeth...Opening up to get as much sun as they can get!!
(Sunflowers do the same thing, turning with the sun)
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Aren't they! Yes - true sunflowers will do that!
  • Alan
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 3 Aug 2018, 06:52
I have seen flowers that do seem to react to the sun but I'm not of any that move during the day to maximise their exposure. At the Mad House, we did have some indoor trees in giant containers and over the year of two would lean towards the light until one day, one fell over!
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Yes - true sunflowers will do this also.
I have to keep turning my rubber tree plant so it doesn't tip over!
  • Lisl
  • England
  • 3 Aug 2018, 07:19
Getting closer and closer to enjoy, Elizabeth
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: I thought you might like a little series on flowers! smile
  • Anne
  • France
  • 3 Aug 2018, 07:24
Very nice series.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thank you very much, Anne!
  • gutteridge
  • Somewhere in deep space
  • 3 Aug 2018, 08:50
These flowers seem to be shouting their presence like trumpeters. I made be small but can act big.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Some of us humans feel the same... though I try not to be too loud! smile
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 3 Aug 2018, 10:13
I am sure they look happy, growing in their patches in the mountain breeze.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: They do seem to be a happy little bunch!
These are similare to the marsh marigolds you showed. Very pretty.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: They are - teenier, and with smaller leaves!
  • sherri
  • Little Rock, Arkansas, USA
  • 3 Aug 2018, 15:26
hmm, i had no idea

amazing info and an amazing image
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Well there ya go! smile Thank you, Sherri!
Very pretty and cleverly adapted to their environment
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Yes they are!
That third shot shows just what a lovely flower it is. Going by your narative it seems to be a very clever flower.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thank you, Brian! Yes it is!
  • Bonnie
  • United States
  • 4 Aug 2018, 00:04
I love how this little flower looks SO BIG in the last photo. The shadow of the pistils is terrific. You also got very sharp leaves all around...really nice DOF. Very sweet flower. I feel like they are singing.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thanks, Bonnie! The land of the small.... I really appreciate your comments - thank you!

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