elizabeth

09 Mar 2015 169 views
 
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photoblog image Metallic Green Bee

Metallic Green Bee

Agapostemon. These are true native bees in the family Halictidae (the Sweat Bees). But they are quite different from the familiar – but non-native - European Honey Bees.

 
Metallic Green Bees are found in North and South America. There are about 40 species, with the greatest abundance in temperate regions and Southwestern United States. The Agapostemon are floral generalists, which means that they visit a number of different flower species. Despite their lack of specificity, generalists like Metallic Green Bees can be important pollinators in gardens and in the wild.
 
Metallic Green Bees are short-tongued, so they favor flowers with a relatively open architecture and easily accessible nectar, which serves as food for adults. Like all foraging insects, they appreciate the convenience of plants with many small flowers clustered together. This in part explains why you’ll notice Metallic Green Bees visiting plants in the Sunflower family (Asteraceae; including Sweet-scent) and the Buckwheats (genus Eriogonum). Both of these plant groups feature many small simple flowers that produce high-quality nectar.
 
~ Mother Nature's Backyard Blogspot
 
 

 

 

  4  

 

Metallic Green Bee

Agapostemon. These are true native bees in the family Halictidae (the Sweat Bees). But they are quite different from the familiar – but non-native - European Honey Bees.

 
Metallic Green Bees are found in North and South America. There are about 40 species, with the greatest abundance in temperate regions and Southwestern United States. The Agapostemon are floral generalists, which means that they visit a number of different flower species. Despite their lack of specificity, generalists like Metallic Green Bees can be important pollinators in gardens and in the wild.
 
Metallic Green Bees are short-tongued, so they favor flowers with a relatively open architecture and easily accessible nectar, which serves as food for adults. Like all foraging insects, they appreciate the convenience of plants with many small flowers clustered together. This in part explains why you’ll notice Metallic Green Bees visiting plants in the Sunflower family (Asteraceae; including Sweet-scent) and the Buckwheats (genus Eriogonum). Both of these plant groups feature many small simple flowers that produce high-quality nectar.
 
~ Mother Nature's Backyard Blogspot
 
 

 

 

  4  

 

comments (23)

  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 9 Mar 2015, 00:12
She is a great beauty, Elizabeth, and so is your image.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: She is, Ray! Thank you so much!
What a beauty Elizabeth! Superb shot.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Isn't she gorgeous! Thanks Richard!
DELIGHTFUL, Elizabeth. I wonder if it was able to fly away after being so heavy-laden?!
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thank you very much Ginnie! He seemed OK to me!
I wouldn't mind being a fly on the wall here Elizabeth.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: No - a very pretty companion!
  • Astrid
  • Netherlands
  • 9 Mar 2015, 07:07
Wow, fabulous, this is such a wonderful macro. A likey to me. Great colours.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thank you very much Astrid!! I'm so appreciative!
nature is so stunning
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Oh yes she is!
  • Chris
  • England
  • 9 Mar 2015, 07:26
A terrific composition Elizabeth!
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thanks so much Chris!
  • Lisl
  • Batheaston
  • 9 Mar 2015, 07:48
Elizabeth - you have excelled yourself!
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Oh thank you so much Lisl!! Much appreciated!
This is a very fine picture of an attractive bee E
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thanks very much Bill!
  • Richard T
  • Suffolk: where the sun rises first in England
  • 9 Mar 2015, 08:29
I love that green
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thanks Richard - I do too!
  • blackdog
  • United Kingdom
  • 9 Mar 2015, 08:42
I see the evidence of their pollinating capabilities - lovely composition too.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Yes, he seems to know his job well! Thank you Mike!
I am more excited about your bee than mine. This is fantastic and my favorite shot of yours ever! Be proud of this. Likey!
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: You are too kind Mary! Thank you so very much!
  • Pauline
  • United Kingdom
  • 9 Mar 2015, 09:48
All I seem to say today is perfect!

A day for truly wonderful shots.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: smile Some days are like that! Thank you very much Pauline!
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 9 Mar 2015, 10:16
Excellent close-up of this creature. The flowers and pollen add to a delightfully colourful picture.

Now, I see a counter. He will be there in time for you two to celebrate my birthday.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thank you so much Louis!!

Ah... when is your b-day? We'll toast to you - though it will be in England, as I'm going there for a few weeks! smile
I've definitely never seen a Bee this colour before, and it's very well photographed.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Isn't he gorgeous! Thank you very much Brian!
An outstanding bee shot Elizabeth. They look great in metallic green
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thank you Janet! A very nice look for them!
This is such an awesome shot. Really love it.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thank you so much Olalekan! And thanks for stopping by!
  • Alan
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 9 Mar 2015, 12:34
Oh my! What a handsome little chap. It certainly seems to be doing well in collecting the pollen.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Isn't he wonderful! Thank you Alan!
Wow! Stunning shot, Buckalew...Fantastic colour.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: A "Wow" from my reserved Englishman... so exciting! Thank you so much Croston! XOX
Fascinating - never seen a bee like that! Great shot, too, Elizabeth.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Isn't he amazing! Very tiny, too. Thank you Tom!
wow.. this is a fabulous image Elizabeth..thanks for sharing
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thank you so much Ronky! And you're very welcome!
  • Anne
  • United Kingdom
  • 11 Mar 2015, 14:16
This is fantastic, what a picture - I love the vibrancy of the colours
  • Robbyne
  • United States
  • 19 Mar 2015, 03:16
LOVE THIS!
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thank you very much Robbyne! I'm so glad you do - it's become one of my favorites! smile

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camera Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XSi
exposure mode shutter priority
shutterspeed 1/200s
aperture f/2.8
sensitivity ISO800
focal length 60.0mm
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