elizabeth

11 May 2013 135 views
 
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photoblog image Hallo!

Hallo!

 

 

Well, who knew...


Herdwick sheep are widely considered to be the most hardy of all Britain's breeds of hill sheep. Probably 99 per cent of Herdwick sheep are kept in commercial flocks in the central and western dales of the Lake District. These fells run to over three thousand feet and facing the westerly rain bearing winds they record the country's highest rainfall.  Herdwicks have a well justified reputation for foraging abillity even in the most difficult terrain.  Many of them live their lives without receiving any supplementary feed. 


The name "Herdwick" is derived from the Old Norse herdvyck, meaning sheep pasture. Though low in lambing capacity and perceived wool quality when compared to more common commercial breeds such as Merino Sheep, Herdwicks are prized for their robust health, their ability to live solely on forage, and their tendency to be territorial and not to stray over the difficult upland terrain of the Lake District.


 

The wool quality of a Herdwick has unique qualities relating to durability. Thick bristle type fibres will often protrude from garments forming a protective barrier layer in blizzards. Most likely the same qualities that protect the sheep in similar conditions. They have been known to survive under a blanket of snow for three days while eating their own wool.

~from Herdwick Sheep Breeders Assc.

 


Langdale Pike

The Lake District

U.K.

March 2013

 

Hallo!

 

 

Well, who knew...


Herdwick sheep are widely considered to be the most hardy of all Britain's breeds of hill sheep. Probably 99 per cent of Herdwick sheep are kept in commercial flocks in the central and western dales of the Lake District. These fells run to over three thousand feet and facing the westerly rain bearing winds they record the country's highest rainfall.  Herdwicks have a well justified reputation for foraging abillity even in the most difficult terrain.  Many of them live their lives without receiving any supplementary feed. 


The name "Herdwick" is derived from the Old Norse herdvyck, meaning sheep pasture. Though low in lambing capacity and perceived wool quality when compared to more common commercial breeds such as Merino Sheep, Herdwicks are prized for their robust health, their ability to live solely on forage, and their tendency to be territorial and not to stray over the difficult upland terrain of the Lake District.


 

The wool quality of a Herdwick has unique qualities relating to durability. Thick bristle type fibres will often protrude from garments forming a protective barrier layer in blizzards. Most likely the same qualities that protect the sheep in similar conditions. They have been known to survive under a blanket of snow for three days while eating their own wool.

~from Herdwick Sheep Breeders Assc.

 


Langdale Pike

The Lake District

U.K.

March 2013

 

comments (17)

Looks friendly enough...
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: I think she might've been - sweet face isn't it!
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 11 May 2013, 02:27
Very fetching aqua highlights, too, Elizabeth.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Yes - I must try that...
Shaun the sheep LOL
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: You're too funny!!!
Oeps, went wrong there
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: smile
  • Alan
  • United Kingdom
  • 11 May 2013, 07:03
They are my favourite breed of sheep. They have such attractive faces and their meat is good, too smile The Lakes would not be the same without them. I'm featuring two little ones today.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: I understand why! They do have very sweet faces I think - and the lambs you feature today are just so exemplary. I love anything (and anyone) that can be tough and strong while maintaining a gentleness.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 11 May 2013, 07:38
They are dead right about the description Elizabeth. This breed is as hardy as Mr Alan Rolfe, a friend of theirs..
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Yes... they do seem an amazing breed - as does he!
I see you like all things curly young Eliza-B
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: I do!!! Embrace the curl! smile (thanks for calling me young, Rico!!)
Just about right for the pot this one.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Oooooh!! You're just about right for the pot! smile
Love how he poses for you and looks directly into the camera. You've caught the colour variations in his coat very well, Elizabeth.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: She did just stop and stand there for several moments! Thank you Beverly!
They look different to many sheep, more resiliant and dare I say it - less stupid.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: You may dare!! I also think they're pretty, very sweet faces!
Old Norse eh? They got around a bit
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Didn't they!
A different look all together! Thank you for the interesting words Elizabeth.
A fine capture too.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: I thought so! Thanks so much Richard!
Happy face indeed in this blue dotted hardy breed. Nice image Elizabeth!
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thanks so much Juan Carlos! Very sweet, aren't they!
The fells wouldn't be the same without them.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: I imagine not, Graeme!
Interesting info... to go with this smiling sheep.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: I thought so! Isn't she sweet!
  • Anne
  • United Kingdom
  • 13 May 2013, 10:34
Modelling the latest knitwear, great shot
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: smile Yes - very proudly! Thanks Anne!
  • Shannon
  • Canada
  • 15 May 2013, 23:21
What a sweet face and I love how he is looking so curiously at you. I've never seen a sheep with so many different colours!! Nice capture!! smile
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Isn't that face precious! They are sort of pretty!

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