elizabeth

01 Aug 2018 65 views
 
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photoblog image Snowball Saxifrage

Snowball Saxifrage

(Micranthes rhomboidea)

Saxifrage Family

(Sacifraga)

 

This species is sometimes placed in the Saxifraga genus, and sometimes in the Micranthes genus.  Colorado flora expert, William Weber, places them in the Micranthes indicating that they have only basal leaves - whereas Sacrifraga have leafy stems.  John Kartesz, another authority for plant names, also places these in the Micranthes genus. 

 

The flower head of Snowball Saxifrage is a compact, slightly elongated cluster containing between 10 and 40 flowers, at the upper end of a stout, reddish stem, densely covered with yellowish, glandular, head-shaped hairs. Flowers have five ascending, green sepals below and between five white, clawed, oblong petals. Petals are a little longer than the sepals. The five stamens have green filaments and yellow anthers. It is found over a wide range of elevations but is most common in the high mountains, in the tundra zone above the treeline. Leaves grow only at the base; they are thick and fleshy, with coarsely toothed edges.

 

SWCOLORADOWILDFLOWERS.com

WILDFLOWER.org

 

 

photoblog image Colorado Trip 115 copy.jpg

 

 

Snowball Saxifrage

(Micranthes rhomboidea)

Saxifrage Family

(Sacifraga)

 

This species is sometimes placed in the Saxifraga genus, and sometimes in the Micranthes genus.  Colorado flora expert, William Weber, places them in the Micranthes indicating that they have only basal leaves - whereas Sacrifraga have leafy stems.  John Kartesz, another authority for plant names, also places these in the Micranthes genus. 

 

The flower head of Snowball Saxifrage is a compact, slightly elongated cluster containing between 10 and 40 flowers, at the upper end of a stout, reddish stem, densely covered with yellowish, glandular, head-shaped hairs. Flowers have five ascending, green sepals below and between five white, clawed, oblong petals. Petals are a little longer than the sepals. The five stamens have green filaments and yellow anthers. It is found over a wide range of elevations but is most common in the high mountains, in the tundra zone above the treeline. Leaves grow only at the base; they are thick and fleshy, with coarsely toothed edges.

 

SWCOLORADOWILDFLOWERS.com

WILDFLOWER.org

 

 

photoblog image Colorado Trip 115 copy.jpg

 

 

comments (14)

Great bokeh in this shot, Elizabeth, these are your best yet I think.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thank you very much, Frank!! Goodness - I really do appreciate that, as I value your opinion so highly!
  • sherri
  • Little Rock, Arkansas, USA
  • 1 Aug 2018, 03:49
the red stem is unexpected and so pretty
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Isn't it?! I was happy with this find!
How unusual and beautiful, Elizabeth. I don't think I've ever seen this one in real life?!
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Isn't it a lovely little thing! Well - you'd only find it above tree line, in the tundra zone - have you been to Colorado or Wyoming?
  • Lisl
  • England
  • 1 Aug 2018, 06:16
Keep them coming, please, Elizabeth - I love your flowers
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: I'm so happy you do, Lisl!
  • Chris
  • Not Nowhere
  • 1 Aug 2018, 06:17
A fine looking thing. Our saxifrages tend not to look as complex as this
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: And, another really tiny thing. I'd imagine yours do not need to be as protective of their warmth and water.
  • gutteridge
  • Somewhere in deep space
  • 1 Aug 2018, 06:19
A good name for this plant, which another beauty.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: I like it when the names make sense!
  • Alan
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 1 Aug 2018, 06:49
I've heard of these before but I can't recall having seen one. It's quite a complex flower.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Well here ya go, then! smile Yes it is!
  • Astrid
  • Nederland
  • 1 Aug 2018, 07:03
This is wonderful, Elizabeth. Thank you for posting the close-up. Great name too.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thank you, Astrid - I'm so amazed at wildflowers! smile Well - any flowers - And I do love when the name makes sense!
Whatever genus they are in (as if they cared) they are a very pretty flower E
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: ;-) They are, Bill!
What a lovely little flower. Your close-up work is surely some of your very best work at the moment.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Isn't it! Thank you so much - this one wasn't quite as clear as I'd have liked, but I wasn't able to get much closer and the wind wouldn't stop! I really appreciate your compliment, Brian!
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 1 Aug 2018, 14:46
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Didn't that turn out lovely? Not on purpose - I don't know how I did it.
There are remarkably few insects above 12,000 feet - mostly little butterflies!
Love that fuzzy stem...
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Isn't that great!
That's a gorgeous image and such a beautiful flower.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thank you so much, Mary!!!
  • Steven
  • Chicagoland
  • 3 Aug 2018, 03:35
What a unique flower with a showy, elegant appearance! Great capture!
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thank you very much Steven! It is a lovely thing!

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