elizabeth

23 Jul 2018 59 views
 
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photoblog image Alpine Wildflower Week

Alpine Wildflower Week

 

Welcome to the colorful world of the Alpine summer!   Some of the hardiest, most beautiful flowers in the world grow and cavort in one of its harshest realms--- the cold, windswept world above treeline.  They survive by hugging the ground to avoid the worst of the weather, thus conserving moisture and warmth.  Their small size reduces the need for water and nutrients.  Many will flower and set fruit early, because flowering does not require the heat of high summer, but seed ripening does. 

 

Many tundra plants can grow in temperatures barely above freezing and carry on photosynthesis in colder conditions than their low elevation counterparts.  Many contain anthocyanins, chemicals that warm plant tissue by converting light into heat.  Wile others conserve moisture by growing as compact cushion plants.

 

This week (and maybe next...) I'll feature some of the beautiful, colorful plants we encountered on our June adventure in the Rocky Mountains.  I hope you enjoy them as much as I do!   :-)

 

In this image....  We're crossing the Continental Divide at over 12,000 feet. 

Left to Right: Lackawanna Peak (13,661 ft); Ellingwood Ridge; La Plata Peak (14,343 ft); Star mountain (12,941 ft)

 

Purple Fringe (Phacelia sericea), purple

Mountain Harebell (Campanula rotundifolia), blue

Alpine Avens (Guem rosii ssp turbinata), yellow

Dwarf Clover (Trifolium nanum), pink & white

Pinnate Leaved Daisy (Erigeron pinnatisectus), white & purple;

Black Headed Daisy (Erigeron melanocephalus), white

 

Alpine Wildflower Week

 

Welcome to the colorful world of the Alpine summer!   Some of the hardiest, most beautiful flowers in the world grow and cavort in one of its harshest realms--- the cold, windswept world above treeline.  They survive by hugging the ground to avoid the worst of the weather, thus conserving moisture and warmth.  Their small size reduces the need for water and nutrients.  Many will flower and set fruit early, because flowering does not require the heat of high summer, but seed ripening does. 

 

Many tundra plants can grow in temperatures barely above freezing and carry on photosynthesis in colder conditions than their low elevation counterparts.  Many contain anthocyanins, chemicals that warm plant tissue by converting light into heat.  Wile others conserve moisture by growing as compact cushion plants.

 

This week (and maybe next...) I'll feature some of the beautiful, colorful plants we encountered on our June adventure in the Rocky Mountains.  I hope you enjoy them as much as I do!   :-)

 

In this image....  We're crossing the Continental Divide at over 12,000 feet. 

Left to Right: Lackawanna Peak (13,661 ft); Ellingwood Ridge; La Plata Peak (14,343 ft); Star mountain (12,941 ft)

 

Purple Fringe (Phacelia sericea), purple

Mountain Harebell (Campanula rotundifolia), blue

Alpine Avens (Guem rosii ssp turbinata), yellow

Dwarf Clover (Trifolium nanum), pink & white

Pinnate Leaved Daisy (Erigeron pinnatisectus), white & purple;

Black Headed Daisy (Erigeron melanocephalus), white

 

comments (20)

A wonderful display!
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: There can be a riot of color if you hit just the right time!
  • Bonnie
  • United States
  • 23 Jul 2018, 00:28
I love the composition of this image. I am trying to figure out where you were standing, lying, squatting to get this wonderful foreground and great DOF???? I want to learn to get better at this skill : )
Secondly, thanks for the interesting info!!
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thanks so much, Bonnie!
I have a tilt screen on my Canon DSLR.... So I held it at the height I thought looked right.... f14.0 to get as much in as I could. I should have used a faster shutter speed- the wind at this elevation (over 12,000 ft) never stops, so some of the flowers are out of focus due to movement. You're welcome! smile
  • Martine
  • France
  • 23 Jul 2018, 00:38
Superbe paysage avec les fleurs en premier plan.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thank you, Martine! It's always lovely to have both!
A great idea for a series...
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thanks, Larry! I thought so! smile
You did a good job on this Elizabeth. Not easy in the windy conditions.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thanks so much, Frank!
  • Lisl
  • England
  • 23 Jul 2018, 05:36
You know your flowers, Elizabeth!
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Well... I have lots of books! smile
Merci pour ce programme floral à  decouvrir , déjà  cette photo est superbe
Bonne journée
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: You're so welcome, Claudine! And thank you!
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 23 Jul 2018, 06:28
A wonderful composition - and thank you very much for your detailed information!
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thank you, Philine! And, you're welcome!
  • Chris
  • Not Nowhere
  • 23 Jul 2018, 06:43
I certainly enjoy these views & plants Elizabeth - wow!
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: I'm so happy you do, Chris!! Thank you!
Awesome, Elizabeth! You're reminding me of the similar phenomenon in the desert during springtime.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Yes - desert flowers just sit and wait for a little moisture - then BURST forth!!
  • Alan
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 23 Jul 2018, 07:03
It's a harsh environment but a these are a joy to see,
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: 'tis... I appreciate those who survive, and thrive in harsh environments!
  • gutteridge
  • Somewhere in deep space
  • 23 Jul 2018, 08:46
Very attractive Elizabeth and thank you for the lesson, most interesting.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thanks so much, Chad! You're welcome!
So much in one spot- like a page from a seed catalogue
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: It's amazing! The tundra plants are so tiny sometimes - if you're not careful you miss them. But they are very variable! There are warning signs to not tread on the tundra- it's such a fragile ecosystem. Most people comply...
I was quite taken with the story of the flowers on Mt. Rainier, though in June they were not present yet. Not as much snow as ones you showed previously. Great job on the photo.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: They are quite amazing, aren't they, Mary. We were happy to find them - we thought we'd be too early!
No - these don't have quite as much snow as the Never Summer Mountains...
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 23 Jul 2018, 11:02
What a wonderful composition. It sets up the flowers perfectly.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thank you so much, Louis! I do like this one!
What a beautiful shot, you and Frank have the most interesting of series coming up this week.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thanks so much, Brian! I'm glad you think so!
  • sherri
  • Little Rock, Arkansas, USA
  • 23 Jul 2018, 15:52
wow

God has the best flowers

so beautifully photographed
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: smile
Aren't they all God's? smile
Thank you very much, Sherri!
A stunning view of the mountains with those beautiful wildflowers in the foreground. Do you know if the wildflowers growing here are protected, Elizabeth, or are you free to pick them?
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thanks very much, Beverly! It was a lovely sight!
Oh they are protected... not only can you not pick them, but there are warning signs to stay on the paths and not trod on them! This environment is so fragile, it can take forever to for a plant to recover such assault.
this is just gorgeous Elizabeth with the mountains framed by the wild flowers....petersmile
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thank you so much, Peter! I thought it was a lovely scene!
  • Ayush Basu
  • Venlo, Netherlands
  • 23 Jul 2018, 20:04
excellent post, Elizabeth, i love the ground hugging shot and much of the text was new information to me!
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thank you so much, Ayush! It was a lovely sight!
I do enjoy a good education!

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camera Canon EOS Rebel T6s
exposure mode aperture priority
shutterspeed 1/40s
aperture f/14.0
sensitivity ISO400
focal length 17.0mm
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