elizabeth

17 Jul 2018 75 views
 
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photoblog image Hayden Spire

Hayden Spire

        12,480 feet (3,804m)

 

The Big Thompson River flows swiftly down Forest Canyon below, as it has for thousands of years.  Several times during the past two million years, frigid climates caused glaciers to form and move down the canyon.  Flowing ever so slowly, these deep "rivers of ice" carved out Forest Canyon along an ancient fault line.  One of them was Rocky Mountain National Park's largest glacier, extending thirteen miles and exceeding depths of two thousand feet.

 

Forest Canyon is one of the parks wildest areas, trails neither lead into it nor rise from its floor to the glacial basins and peaks above.  Mule deer, elk, black bear, mountain lion, beaver, squirrels and rabbits enhabit the canyon.  Golden eagles soar above.

 

Smaller glaciers formed in side valleys.  Hayden Gorge bears the characteristic  U-shape of a glacial valley (cirque).  The gentle terrain atop Terra Tomah Mountain and the areas above the glacial cirques escaped the glacier's grinding action.

 

To the left of Hayden Spire is Sprague Mountain (12,713 ft), then Stones Peak (12,922 ft).  To the right is Hayden Gorge, and the dome of Terra Tomah Mountain (12,718 ft).

 

Information from the National Park Service / U.S. Department of the Interior, and National Geographic's "Rocky Mountain National Park Road Guide"

 

photoblog image Colorado Trip 74 (2).jpg

 

Hayden Spire

        12,480 feet (3,804m)

 

The Big Thompson River flows swiftly down Forest Canyon below, as it has for thousands of years.  Several times during the past two million years, frigid climates caused glaciers to form and move down the canyon.  Flowing ever so slowly, these deep "rivers of ice" carved out Forest Canyon along an ancient fault line.  One of them was Rocky Mountain National Park's largest glacier, extending thirteen miles and exceeding depths of two thousand feet.

 

Forest Canyon is one of the parks wildest areas, trails neither lead into it nor rise from its floor to the glacial basins and peaks above.  Mule deer, elk, black bear, mountain lion, beaver, squirrels and rabbits enhabit the canyon.  Golden eagles soar above.

 

Smaller glaciers formed in side valleys.  Hayden Gorge bears the characteristic  U-shape of a glacial valley (cirque).  The gentle terrain atop Terra Tomah Mountain and the areas above the glacial cirques escaped the glacier's grinding action.

 

To the left of Hayden Spire is Sprague Mountain (12,713 ft), then Stones Peak (12,922 ft).  To the right is Hayden Gorge, and the dome of Terra Tomah Mountain (12,718 ft).

 

Information from the National Park Service / U.S. Department of the Interior, and National Geographic's "Rocky Mountain National Park Road Guide"

 

photoblog image Colorado Trip 74 (2).jpg

 

comments (16)

Very nice tones...smile
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thank you very much, Larry!
  • Beth
  • United States
  • 17 Jul 2018, 02:22
Wonderful use of B&W. I definitely prefer it to the color version.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thanks so much, Beth! I don't do B&W very often - but I processed several of these photos from the Rocky's this way and I'm rather pleased with the results!
I think the b/w works well, Ell' ( see what I did there ? ) What a view this was.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thank you very much, Frank - though I think you prefer the color version... (I did see what you did... smile ) Incredible place!
  • Bonnie
  • United States
  • 17 Jul 2018, 02:30
These are iconic and just breathtaking. I like the info, too. While I like the B/W, I think the color is very eye catching. Nice we don't have to choose and can have BOTH!
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Aren't, they though! You're welcome!
Frank, I think, prefers the color version as well... I'm glad I can present both!
  • sherri
  • Little Rock, Arkansas, USA
  • 17 Jul 2018, 02:31
it's amazing a beautiful to view

i'd hate to have to walk across it
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thank you, Sherri! It is incredible to be there!
Everything here is MASSIVE - so we're lucky to live in these times... smile
  • Chris
  • Not Nowhere
  • 17 Jul 2018, 06:50
This is fabulously dramatic country
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Like the Grand Canyon - words elude me...
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 17 Jul 2018, 06:53
Oh, what a great mountainscape - we could be in the European Alps.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Yes! To which they've been compared!
  • gutteridge
  • Somewhere in deep space
  • 17 Jul 2018, 06:56
A photograph with altitude!
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Ha! Very good!
  • Alan
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 17 Jul 2018, 07:23
The B&W shot makes me think that no man has ever knowingly been there. Oy sounds like the perfect habitat for the wildlife you mention.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: I'm glad it give you that feeling.... you do feel that way - standing on a far ridge gazing over toward this!
You have a lot of mountains round your way E.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Yes we do - thank goodness! I must have mountains! There are roughly 238 peaks within the confines of Rocky Mountain National Park - which is 358 square miles (compared to the size of England at 50,301 square miles).
  • Anne
  • France
  • 17 Jul 2018, 08:52
Such a beautiful landscape !
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Truly! Thank you so much, Anne!!
Love it. B&W too for something different!! smile
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thanks so much, Rob! Yeah - I don't usually do B&W - but thought it suited! smile
Magnificent scenery. Interestingly the Lake District mountains were created by glacial movement, hence the 'U' shaped valleys, I wonder if these and those were created at the same time during our Ice Ages.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: I'm sorry, Brian - I had written a reply to this - but see it's disappeared.

It is magnificent, indeed! And yes - I do wonder if it all occurred in the same time frame. Curious this world of ours! smile
Such a gorgeous location beautifully photographed, Elizabeth. I imagine the number of full time residents wouldn't be all that high. Very isolated without many conveniences I should think.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: It is an awe inspiring place, Beverly! Thank you so much!
The only residents in this valley are animals! This is within Rocky Mountain National Park, the few human residents live in the two park employee residential areas on the borders. Most park employees live just outside the park boundaries, and in nearby communities like Loveland and Ft Collins.
Pretty inhospitable country!
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Yes- and it will forever remain (unless trump finds out there's uranium or coal that can easily be mined...)
  • Harry
  • USA
  • 17 Jul 2018, 22:02
Wonderful black and white vista. This classic version outdoes its color twin.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thanks so much for your vote, Harry! I always wonder how they'll go over! smile

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