elizabeth

16 Feb 2018 209 views
 
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photoblog image Ripples in the Sand

Ripples in the Sand

The monument is situated at an elevation of 4,235 feet (1,291 m) in the mountain-ringed Tularosa Basin and comprises the southern part of a 275 sq mi (710 km2) field of white sand dunes composed of gypsum crystals. The gypsum dune field is the largest of its kind on Earth.  Gypsum rarely occurs as sand because it is water-soluble. Normally, rain would dissolve the gypsum and carry it to the sea. The Tularosa Basin has no outlet to the sea, so it traps rain that dissolves gypsum from the surrounding San Andres and Sacremento. Thus water either sinks into the ground, or forms shallow pools that subsequently dry out and leave gypsum on the surface in a crystalline form called selenite. 

 

photoblog image Thanksgiving 2015 45 2 b3.jpg

Ripples in the Sand

The monument is situated at an elevation of 4,235 feet (1,291 m) in the mountain-ringed Tularosa Basin and comprises the southern part of a 275 sq mi (710 km2) field of white sand dunes composed of gypsum crystals. The gypsum dune field is the largest of its kind on Earth.  Gypsum rarely occurs as sand because it is water-soluble. Normally, rain would dissolve the gypsum and carry it to the sea. The Tularosa Basin has no outlet to the sea, so it traps rain that dissolves gypsum from the surrounding San Andres and Sacremento. Thus water either sinks into the ground, or forms shallow pools that subsequently dry out and leave gypsum on the surface in a crystalline form called selenite. 

 

photoblog image Thanksgiving 2015 45 2 b3.jpg

comments (19)

  • Steven
  • Chicagoland
  • 16 Feb 2018, 02:02
Wow!! Awesome patterns captured here that are quite mesmerizing!!
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thanks so much, Steven! They were mesmerizing to us when we were there, as well! smile
  • sherri
  • Arkansas USA
  • 16 Feb 2018, 03:04
oh, that is so pretty
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thank you, Sherri!
  • Martine
  • France
  • 16 Feb 2018, 04:45
Très joli, j'aime les dessins que le vent forme sur le sable.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Lovely, aren't they!
  • Astrid
  • Netherlands
  • 16 Feb 2018, 04:45
WOW, this is impressive and what great pictures. Fascinating over and over. Thank you for the education with it.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thanks so much, Astrid! I appreciate your interest... and thanks for the video, etc!
Not the same, Elizabeth, but it's reminding me of The English Patient.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Oh - I'm afraid I haven't seen it... :-(
Magnifiques photos ...j'adore !!
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thank you!!
  • Lisl
  • England
  • 16 Feb 2018, 06:36
Some very dainty footsteps, Elizabeth
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Yes - I've no idea who made them!
  • Chris
  • Not Nowhere
  • 16 Feb 2018, 06:42
The ripple-effect in the sand is very attractive
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: I do like the softness of the patterns!
  • Alan
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 16 Feb 2018, 06:45
A fascinating read. I love your composition with teh ripples and then the footprints.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thanks, Alan!
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 16 Feb 2018, 07:14
Fascinating - these seem to traces of animals.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Yes - but I don't know what...
Thank you for the science lesson and the pictures of this amazing place E
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: You're very welcome, Bill!
  • gutteridge
  • Somewhere in deep space
  • 16 Feb 2018, 08:25
Fascinating pattern like a Bridget Riley art piece.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Kind of!!
This is the most interesting of places, and no doubt photographically there must be a never ending selection of pictures.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Very much so, on both your points!
Otherworldly...
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Good description, Larry!
Always sure it's just sand? I could post a picture almost the same thing that would be snow smile
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Positive! smile Easily mistakable, isn't it!
Lovely pics.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thank you, Tom!
Super abstracts, Elizabeth, what a place!
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thanks so much, Frank!
What a crazy place when you think in geological terms. Do they gather (it doesn't have to be mined here) huge amounts of gypsum here?
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Yup!
Nope!
The entire basin is an ecological treasure.... and of course, White Sands National Park is federally protected. Which doesn't mean Trump and his idiot cronies won't deregulate it.... This is from Wiki:
The Tularosa Basin is in the Chihuahuan Desert ecoregion, with the former Great Plains grassland habitat ecotones. Because of the closed nature of the basin, a number of unique ecological niches have developed. A significant number of endemic species are only found in the Tularosa Basin. These include the White Sands pupfish—(Cyprinodon tularosa) and the Oscura Mountains chipmunk.
  • Ray
  • Not Germany...
  • 18 Feb 2018, 12:51
Delightful images, Elizabeth.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thank you, Ray!

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sensitivity ISO160
focal length 42.0mm
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