elizabeth

02 Feb 2018 136 views
 
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photoblog image Oleander

Oleander

Nerium oleander

 

A shrub or small tree in the dogbane family Apocynaceae, toxic in all its parts. It is the only species currently classified in the genus Nerium. Oleander is one of the most poisonous commonly grown garden plants.  There are estimated to be 25 million Oleanders planted along highways and roadsides throughout the State of California. Because of its durability, Oleander was planted prolifically on Galveston Island in Texas after the disastrous Hurricane of 1900. They are so prolific that Galveston is known as the 'Oleander City'; an annual Oleander festival is hosted every spring.

 

 

Oleander

Nerium oleander

 

A shrub or small tree in the dogbane family Apocynaceae, toxic in all its parts. It is the only species currently classified in the genus Nerium. Oleander is one of the most poisonous commonly grown garden plants.  There are estimated to be 25 million Oleanders planted along highways and roadsides throughout the State of California. Because of its durability, Oleander was planted prolifically on Galveston Island in Texas after the disastrous Hurricane of 1900. They are so prolific that Galveston is known as the 'Oleander City'; an annual Oleander festival is hosted every spring.

 

 

comments (17)

  • Ray
  • Not Germany...
  • 2 Feb 2018, 00:22
They grow quite well in Thailand, too, Elizabeth, but Na has banned them from our garden.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: I imagine they'll grow anywhere, Ray! Good for Na - stick with the natives!
  • Steven
  • Chicagoland
  • 2 Feb 2018, 04:03
What an awesome capture with beautiful color and clarity! I love how the sunlight outlines the edges.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thank you very kindly, Steven! Much appreciated!
  • sherri
  • Arkansas USA
  • 2 Feb 2018, 05:32
one i've heard of but never have seen in person
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Well - here ya go! smile
  • Lisl
  • England
  • 2 Feb 2018, 06:18
This week's flowers have all, not surpisingly, been new to me, Elizabeth. I have really enjoyed seeing them
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: I'm so pleased I've been able to introduce you to some new specimens, Elisabeth!
  • Chris
  • Not Nowhere
  • 2 Feb 2018, 06:33
So pretty yet toxic..
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: You take the bad with the good! smile
I wouldn't mind being known as the Oleander Person, Elizabeth. HA! What a gorgeous flower.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: smile OK, Ginnie! I'll call you that from now on! smile
  • Alan
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 2 Feb 2018, 07:11
That's fascinating to hear. I'm sure in teh UK, great steps would be taken to eradicate it in case people were dat enough to eat it. This is a beautiful capture of it; I love the translucency of the petals.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: I know what you mean, Alan.
You'll be horrified to learn they're putting a wall around Horseshoe Bend! UGH!
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 2 Feb 2018, 08:04
My dad had them in his garden - fortunately I never thought of flowers as food smile
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: They are beautiful - and make a terrific barrier between properties.
Many flowers are edible... just not this one! smile
  • gutteridge
  • Somewhere in deep space
  • 2 Feb 2018, 08:17
Very nice.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thank you, Chad!
  • Astrid
  • Netherlands
  • 2 Feb 2018, 08:45
This is a wonderful closeup and what a wonderful presentation as well. Love the boarder and the choice of the colour of the text.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thanks so much, Astrid - I thought I'd go all p!nky for the day! smile
I just had to look them up. It is a beautiful thing.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: They are lovely - when I lived north of Phoenix we had a hedge about 20 feet high and 100 feet long as a barrier between our property and the neighbors! They were a joy!
  • Anne
  • United Kingdom
  • 2 Feb 2018, 13:49
What a lovely image Elizabeth.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thank you very much, Anne!
This beautiful image could easily grace the pages of a magazine or a suitable calendar.
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Goodness, thank you for your high praise, Brian!
I never knew they were toxic!
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Glad to be of service!
I am obliged to repeat myself smile
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Oh - thanks so much, Claudio!
Clearly useful, in spite of its toxicity!
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: When I lived in New River, north of Phoenix, we had a hedge about 20 feet high and 100 feet long as a barrier between our property and the neighbor's!
The clarity and quality of this image is superb, people try to grown them here but with our rubbish climate they always look tatty
Elizabeth Croston Buckalew: Thanks so much, Martin! They are sun lovers... smile

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camera Canon EOS Rebel T6s
exposure mode aperture priority
shutterspeed 1/160s
aperture f/5.6
sensitivity ISO250
focal length 85.0mm
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